Sunday, March 19, 2017

Cordless handset

ESI  Cordless Handset II Repeater The  optional  ESI  Cordless Handset  II  Repeater  extends the  coverage  area  of  the ESI  Cordless  Handset  II  in all  directions,  including up and down. If  Repeaters  are installed  so their  coverage  area  overlaps  that  of  the base  station,  the base  station  can  hand off  calls to  the  Repeaters  as the  user  moves from  one  coverage  area to  another.  When it’s  connected to  a Repeater,  the ESI  Cordless  Handset  II  operates  exactly  as  it  does  when  connected to  its base  station,  and the  handoff  from  the base  station to  the  Repeater  occurs  seamlessly  without  disturbing the  end  user,  even during an active  call. Each ESI  Cordless Handset  II  base  station supports  up  to  six  repeaters,  regardless  of  configuration. •  Each  Repeater  supports  up  to  two  direct  connections  to  other  Repeaters. •  No  Repeater  can  be  more  than  three  connections  —  or  hops  —  from  the base  station. All  Repeaters,  regardless  of  configuration,  must  be registered  to  the base  station. Repeaters  that  are registered  directly  to  a  base station  (left),  do  not  require  use  of  the optional Repeater  Configurator  Kit. These  Repeaters can be  installed  using automatic configuration. However,  Repeaters registered to  the base station  through  another  Repeater  (one example shown,  right)  do  require use of  the Repeater  Configurator  Kit. For  detailed information  on installing  Repeaters,  refer  to  the  ESI  Cordless  Handset II Repeater  Installation  Manual  (ESI  # 0450-1248).

Sunday, March 12, 2017

call on a PRI

Every  call  on  a  PRI  span  is  sent  with  the  called  number  in  the setup message.  This  means you can  determine whether  to  use a  number  as  a pilot  number  or  as  a DID  number.  Pilot  numbers  are  a means  of  routing  a company’s primary  published phone  number  differently  from  a  DID.  Each  ESI  Communications  Server  has  a different  capacity  for  pilot  entries,  each  with  its  own answer  ring  assignment;  see “Translation tables”  in “System  capacities”  (page  B.1).  This  is  important,  because the  dynamic  channel  allocation  prevents  you from routing based on channel. Pilot  numbers can  be  routed  to  an  ID  branch,  department,  extension or  mailbox.  This  varies  from  DIDs  in  that, when a  DID number  is  routed  to  an  extension,  it  is  considered answered and  follows  the  busy/ no-answer routing  of  the  extension;  but,  with  pilot numbers,  the  call  will be  routed  to  the  extensions  for  live  answer  for  the designated  number  of  rings,  then can  be  routed  to  an  ID  branch  in  the  event  of busy/no-answer.  If  the  PRI  span is  used  for  outgoing calls,  pilot  table entry  1  is  used  for  outgoing  Caller  ID,  as  well.  Because of  this,  pilot number  entry  1 should  always be  programmed  with  10 digits.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

PC administration

Installing the System  Administration Application The System  Administration  application is  installed on  a PC  that is connected to the LAN. Only  a user  on that PC can install  the System  Administration  application.   The System  Administration  application  will communicate  with the messaging system through its LAN port.  Installation of the MERLIN Messaging or PARTNER  Messaging System Administration application can be performed from the MERLIN  Messaging System  Release 4.0 Library CD or the PARTNER Messaging System Release 7.0 Library CD. Depending  on your  system,  you  select  “PARTNER  Messaging  System Administration” or  “MERLIN Messaging System Administration” under “Install Software” from the main  window of the  Library CD. This  will  automatically launch an installation wizard. Follow the  instructions  in the installation wizard  to install the System Administration  application.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

cordless repeater

Cordless Handset II Repeater The  optional  ESI  Cordless Handset  II  Repeater  extends the  coverage  area  of  the ESI  Cordless  Handset  II  in all  directions,  including up and down. If  Repeaters  are installed  so their  coverage  area  overlaps  that  of  the base  station,  the base  station  can  hand off  calls to  the  Repeaters  as the  user  moves from  one  coverage  area to  another.  When it’s  connected to  a Repeater,  the ESI  Cordless  Handset  II  operates  exactly  as  it  does  when  connected to  its base  station,  and the  handoff  from  the base  station to  the  Repeater  occurs  seamlessly  without  disturbing the  end  user,  even during an active  call. Each ESI  Cordless Handset  II  base  station supports  up  to  six  repeaters,  regardless  of  configuration. •  Each  Repeater  supports  up  to  two  direct  connections  to  other  Repeaters. •  No  Repeater  can  be  more  than  three  connections  —  or  hops  —  from  the base  station. All  Repeaters,  regardless  of  configuration,  must  be registered  to  the base  station. Repeaters  that  are registered  directly  to  a  base station  (left),  do  not  require  use  of  the optional Repeater  Configurator  Kit. These  Repeaters can be  installed  using automatic configuration. However,  Repeaters registered to  the base station  through  another  Repeater  (one example shown,  right)  do  require use of  the Repeater  Configurator  Kit. For  detailed information  on installing  Repeaters,  refer  to  the  ESI  Cordless  Handset II Repeater  Installation 

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

PBX using standard loop-start lines

CO  lines An  ESI  Communications Server  can operate either  on  a station-by-station  basis as a  PBX or  as  a combined key/PBX  using standard loop-start  lines.  If  a  station has  line  keys  programmed,  the  user  accesses  the lines  by pressing  one  of  these  keys  or  by dialing  the  line group number  9  (or  8  or  71–76).  If  a  station does  not  have line keys  programmed,  the  user  always  accesses  CO  lines by dialing  9  (or  8  or  71–76).  Since the  system  handles call  transfer  and  auto  attendant  functions  efficiently,  operating  in  the PBX mode  provides  more  programmable feature keys  for  other  uses and  the opportunity  for  glare is  greatly  reduced.  Notes:  When  a  port  card  is  added  to  or  removed  from  the  system  —  i.e., thus  changing  the  number  and configuration  of  cards  in  the system  —  you must  reprogram the CO  lines.  However, if  a  port  card  is replaced by  the  same  type of  port  card  (e.g.,  when you replace a faulty  684 card  with  a new  684 card1), you don’t  have  to  reprogram the CO  lines. As  a  visual indication of  CO  line usage,  the phone’s  display will  show  on/off-hook  line status. All phone programmable keys  default  to  being unprogrammed (except  on extension 100,  where the first  key defaults  as a day/night  key).  Use  extension button mapping  (Function 35;  see page  G.36)  to  assign line keys  system-wide.  An  individual station’s  keys  can be reassigned using  either  PROGRAM  2  or  “radio-key programming”  at  that  station.

Sunday, February 26, 2017

System timing parameters

System  timing parameters Function  151: Flash  hook duration This  sets  the  time  (in  seconds) that  a  flash  hook  will  be  sent  on  the  current  line  to  the  Telco  from  a  digital phone  set.  The  default  setting of  1.5  will cause  disconnect and  fresh  dial  tone  from  the  CO. Range: 0.2–2.0.  Default:  1.5. Function  152: Transfer  forward timer This  sets  the  number  of  times a  transferred or  DID1  call will ring  before  following  the  day/night routing  for the extension or  department. Range: 1–9  rings.  Default:  3. Function  153: Recall timers Function  1531: Exclusive hold  recall  timer This  is  the  amount  of  time, in  seconds,  that  a  call  will remain  on  exclusive  hold  before  recalling  to  the extension that  initiated the  exclusive hold.   Range: 5–960  seconds.  Default:  60. Function  1532: Hold  recall  timer This  is  the  amount  of  time, in  seconds,  that  a  call  will remain  on  hold  before  recalling  to  the  extension  that initiated  the  hold. Range: 5–960  seconds.  Default:  60. Function  1533: Hold  recall  timeout  timer This  is  the  number  of  times  a  station  will recall-ring  before  being  re-routed. Range: 2–40  rings.  Default:  6. Function  154:  ACD  timers Function  1541:  ACD  exit timer This  is  the  amount  of  time, in  seconds,  that  a  call  will remain  in  ACD  department  queues  before  following the department  reroute  (see Function  33,  page  G.23). Range: 5–600 seconds  (or  0  for  no  limit).  Default:  180. Function  1542:  ACD  wrap  timer This  is  the  maximum  amount of  time, in  seconds,  that  an  agent  can  remain  in  wrap  mode. If this  function  is turned  off,  agents cannot  place their  stations in  Wrap Mode  (see  the “ACD  agent operation”  chapter  in  the User’s  Guide). Range: 5–600  seconds  (0  for no  limit).  Default:  0 (no  limit). Function  1543:  ACD  hold  recall  timer This  is  the  amount  of  time, in  seconds,  that  a  call  will remain  on  hold  by  a  logged-in  ACD  agent  before recall.  (A  logged-out  user  will  follow the  Function  1532 timer  when  placing  someone on  hold.) Range: 5–960  seconds.  Default:  60.

Friday, February 24, 2017

system structure

manual provides  information for completely programming  a  new  DX-80 system  from  scratch.  Comdial  also provides  you with  some  tools you can use to reduce your  programming time.   These tools include: •   a  series of worksheets for  you to plan your system structure,  and record the programming for future reference if  necessary.   For more details,  see Appendix A,  Worksheets. •   copying  a  base  CO line or  extension’s setups  to several  other  CO  line or extensions thereby eliminating the  need to program them individually,  and •  using one of four standard database programming templates provided  with the DX-80 on CD part number DX80UTILCD.   You can  choose the template that most  closely matches your  new customer’s  site  needs,  and then add  whatever custom  changes  you need to make.   This  approach saves you the time  of programming the entire system from scratch. For  more  information on these and  other aids  the DX-80  provides  to allow you to program  a  system efficiently,  see  Section 3.1,  Shortcuts to  Help  You  Work Faster. When  you  are programming  a  new system from  scratch, perform the following basic tasks: 1.  Set  up  the system  features. 2.  Set  up  the CO lines. 3.  Set  up  call handling. 4.  Set  up  the toll restrictions. 5.  Set  up  the UCD groups. 6.  Set  up  Voice Mail  (if applicable).